Welcome to the Times Square Alliance Website

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Humanity Not at its Best, or Worst - but at its Most

Times Square is the intersection of spectators and performers, tourists and locals; all the diversity of the city, the country, and the world interacting. Times Square accommodates many activities both planned and spontaneous, and connects streetscapes, underground passages, and penthouses. Finally there are the layers of history that lie under the streets and behind the facades of theaters, diners and stores. The density and the congestion are part of what is authentic to a place where art, life and commerce quite literally collide.

Much of what constitutes modern American culture has been invented and reinvented, tested, and displayed in the few blocks that make up the Times Square district. This is where Americans devise new ways to entertain themselves. By 1928, some 264 shows were produced in 76 theaters in Times Square. These theaters showcased not old-world opera, but the new popular culture born of America’s immigrant stew – vaudeville and musicals, jazz and the movies. Today it remains the busiest theater district in the world, and is also home to MTV, ABC, B.B. Kings, Hard Rock Cafe, Best Buy Theater, and Madame Tussaud’s.

The most popular spectacles of Times Square have always been free – the dazzling electrical signs that gave Broadway its reputation as “The Great White Way.” Over the course of the past hundred years, Times Square has become an outdoor laboratory for new ways to communicate and advertise.

Times Square is also where American news was made. It was here that writers like Walter Winchell and Damon Runyon perfected their punchy reporting style, the gossip column, and the use of slang, that redefined what news was – how it was to be written and reported, and what counted. Now ABC’s “Good Morning America,” Reuters, Viacom, Condé Naste, and of course the New York Times are all here.

Prostitution and sex theaters defined the area for much of the post-World War II era. In a larger sense, Times Square was a place where boundaries could be pushed, and broken, and desire expressed. It is no accident that, in Times Square, women could challenge the rules of dating, and gays and lesbians could find a greater level of freedom than they found elsewhere in the city.

Times Square blossomed in the first third of the twentieth century, only to slide into notorious decay in the face of the post-1945 world of television, suburbs, and racial strife. Times Square has returned in the past two decades. The crowds that first made the place have also returned, contributing to the unique mix of creativity and commerce, energy and edge that makes Times Square both an international icon and a universe in miniature, reflecting the obsessions, desires and priorities of a changing world.

 

Explore More Times Square History:

  • Historical Walking Tours: Get a glimpse into Times Square’s vibrant past and provide the back story for such historic traditions as the New Year’s Eve ball drop.
  • Theater: Brief Tour: Some historic and modern theaters, restaurants and landmarks drama devotees won't want to miss.
  • Attractions: From MTV to the Brill Building - explore some of the music world's most important locations.
  • Historical Resources: Other sources of Times Square historical information.

 

Official Times Square Walking Tours Walking Tours 

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The Times Square History Tour, presented by Manhattan Walking Tour, will give you a glimpse into Times Square’s vibrant past and provide the backstory for such historic traditions as the New Year’s Eve ball drop.

The Broadway Walking Tour, presented by Walkin’ Broadway, will dive into the rich theater heritage of the Great White Way, including little known stories and backstage secrets from popular Broadway shows.

Book your tour now!