Margaret Atwood has long been a literary titan, but “current events have polished the oracular sheen of her reputation,” says The New Yorker. With her 1985 novel The Handmaid’s Tale  back on the bestsellers lists and its television adaptation awarded  eleven Emmy Awards, it seems Atwood’s sharp eye is more necessary—and  prescient—than ever.

“Every totalitarian  government on the planet has always taken a very great interest in  women’s reproductive rights,” says Margaret Atwood; a disquieting  insight at any time, but particularly in today’s portentous political  landscape. Just as it did when it was published, the story of The Handmaid’s Tale—a  future where women’s reproductive rights are governed by a conservative  (and patriarchal) administration—is unearthing chilling patterns to an  uneasy public.  

Two blockbuster television adaptations—first The Handmaid’s Tale, then Alias Grace—have meant that Margaret Atwood’s vision is reaching a wider audience than ever before. The Handmaid’s Tale received 13 Emmy nominations and eight awards—including for Best Drama. Atwood herself received a standing ovation. Alias Grace,  now streaming on Netflix, is based on Atwood’s Giller-winning,  Booker-shortlisted murder mystery, and is notable for being written,  produced, and directed by women.

A winner of many international literary awards, including the  prestigious Booker Prize, Arthur C. Clarke Award, Governor General’s  Award, the PEN Pinter Prize, the Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Book Critics Circle, and  a Guggenheim Fellowship, she is the author of more than fifty volumes  of poetry, children’s literature, fiction, and non-fiction. She is  perhaps best known for her novels, which include The Edible Woman, The Robber Bride, The Blind Assassin, Oryx and Crake, and The Year of the Flood. Her non-fiction book Payback: Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth, part of the Massey Lecture series, was made into a documentary. Her novel, MadAddam (the third novel in the Oryx and Crake trilogy), has received rave reviews: “An extraordinary achievement” (The Independent); “A fitting and joyous conclusion” (The New York Times).  The trilogy is being adapted into an HBO TV series by celebrated  filmmaker Darren Aronofsky. Atwood’s most recent collection of short  stories is Stone Mattress. Her most recent novel is Hag-Seed, a modern retelling of Shakespeare’s The Tempest.

 

September 20, 2019
8:00 PM
The Town Hall
123 W 43rd St
New York, NY 10036
The Town Hall
Save to Calendar 2019-09-20 20:00:00 2019-09-20 20:00:00 America/New_York An Evening With Margaret Atwood Margaret Atwood has long been a literary titan, but “current events have polished the oracular sheen of her reputation,” says The New Yorker. With her 1985 novel The Handmaid’s Tale  back on the bestsellers lists and its television adaptation awarded  eleven Emmy Awards, it seems Atwood’s sharp eye is more necessary—and  prescient—than ever. “Every totalitarian  government on the planet has always taken a very great interest in  women’s reproductive rights,” says Margaret Atwood; a disquieting  insight at any time, but particularly in today’s portentous political  landscape. Just as it did when it was published, the story of The Handmaid’s Tale—a  future where women’s reproductive rights are governed by a conservative  (and patriarchal) administration—is unearthing chilling patterns to an  uneasy public.   Two blockbuster television adaptations—first The Handmaid’s Tale, then Alias Grace—have meant that Margaret Atwood’s vision is reaching a wider audience than ever before. The Handmaid’s Tale received 13 Emmy nominations and eight awards—including for Best Drama. Atwood herself received a standing ovation. Alias Grace,  now streaming on Netflix, is based on Atwood’s Giller-winning,  Booker-shortlisted murder mystery, and is notable for being written,  produced, and directed by women. A winner of many international literary awards, including the  prestigious Booker Prize, Arthur C. Clarke Award, Governor General’s  Award, the PEN Pinter Prize, the Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Book Critics Circle, and  a Guggenheim Fellowship, she is the author of more than fifty volumes  of poetry, children’s literature, fiction, and non-fiction. She is  perhaps best known for her novels, which include The Edible Woman, The Robber Bride, The Blind Assassin, Oryx and Crake, and The Year of the Flood. Her non-fiction book Payback: Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth, part of the Massey Lecture series, was made into a documentary. Her novel, MadAddam (the third novel in the Oryx and Crake trilogy), has received rave reviews: “An extraordinary achievement” (The Independent); “A fitting and joyous conclusion” (The New York Times).  The trilogy is being adapted into an HBO TV series by celebrated  filmmaker Darren Aronofsky. Atwood’s most recent collection of short  stories is Stone Mattress. Her most recent novel is Hag-Seed, a modern retelling of Shakespeare’s The Tempest.   The Town Hall, 123 W 43rd St New York, NY 10036 The Town Hall
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Talks & Lectures
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